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Great Fires: 1906 Great Earthquake & Fire

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Appendix A.
Earthquake in California, April 18, 1906
Special Report of Maj. Gen. Adolphus W. Greely, U. S. A., Commanding the Pacific Division

IV. Chief Commissary, Department of California, Purchasing Commissary. [Maj. C. R. KRAUTHOFF, Commissary.]              

 

April. 

May. 

June. 

July. 

Total. 

1. Services: 

 

 

 

 

 

(a) Clerical 

 

$1,170.50 

$309.50 

 

$1,480.00 

(b) Not clerical 

$19.50 

7,347.30 

$193.50 for meals.4,534.75 

 

11,901.55 

2. Material 

28,535.34 

8,199.35 

6,887.20 

 

43,621.89 

Total 

28,554.84 

16,717.15 

11,731.45 

 

57,003.44 

No expenditures for permanent improvements.
V. Depot Quartermaster, San Francisco, Cal. [Maj. C. A. DEVOL, Quartermaster.]                                                

 

April. 

May. 

June. 

Total. 

1. Services: 

 

 

 

 

(a) Clerical— 

 

 

 

 

Pacific Division 

$88.89 

$680.51 

$1,244.44 

$2,013.84 

Department of California 

 

267.50 

199.00 

466.50 

Depot quartermaster 

65.00 

575.17 

881.67 

1,521.84 

Total 

153.89 

1,523.18 

2,325.11 

4,002.18 

(b) Not clerical— 

 

 

 

 

Depot quartermaster 

 

34,627.88 

6,980.21 

41,608.09 

Permanent camps 

 

9,526.91 

9,462.25 

18,989.16 

Chauffeurs 

165.00 

1,529.50 

1,487.50 

3,182.00 

Total 

165.00 

45,684.29 

17,929.96 

63,779.25 

Transportation— 

 

 

 

 

Land 

 

10,418.77 

37,776.81 

48,195.58 

Water 

 

990.00 

1,037.50 

2,027.50 

Autos 

7,200.00 

4,718.00 

4,626.25 

16,544.25 

Total 

7,200.00 

16,126.77 

43,440.56 

66,767.33 

Total, not clerical 

7,365.00 

61,811.06 

61,370.52 

130,546.58 

2. Material: 

 

 

 

 

General 

 

1,438.92 

18,366.60 

19,805.52 

Autos 

 

13,558.45 

 

13,558.45 

Auto supplies 

 

773.36 

 

773.36 

Total 

 

15,770.73 

18,366.60 

34,137.33 

No expenditures for permanent improvements.
RELIEF FUND. Summary of receipts and expenditures by the different departments.

Chief signal officer: 

 

Received 

$6,000.00 

Expended 

4,963.12 

Acting chief quartermaster, Department California: 

 

Received 

100,000.00 

Expended 

50.00 

Medical supply depot: 

 

Received 

150,000.00 

Expended 

52,799.11 

Purchasing commissary: 

 

Received 

125,000.00 

Expended 

57,003.44 

Depot quartermaster: 

 

Received 

300,000.00 

Expended to July 2, 1906 

168,686.09 

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HEADQUARTERS PACIFIC DIVISION,
INSPECTOR-GENERAL'S OFFICE,
Presidio of San Francisco, Cal., July 31, 1906.

SIR: I have the honor to submit the following report in the case of the disappearance of liquors which have been received at and transferred from the medical supply depot, the Presidio, San Francisco, Cal.:
The investigation was made in compliance with letter of instructions dated headquarters Pacific Division, July 21, 1906, copy attached (marked C). The testimony in the case is appended (marked D). During the progress of the investigation the communication, a copy of which is appended hereto (marked E) was received and acted on.

The managing editor of The San Francisco Call was requested to furnish the name of the reporter who made the statement referred to, and to send him to headquarters Pacific Division for examination. The managing editor sent the reply attached hereto (marked F). Nevertheless, the reporter appeared in person before the inspector, and on interrogation admitted that the statement in The Call referred to in the telegram was made without sufficient data, was entirely unwarranted and a mistake. That particular subject was therefore dropped.

On July 30, 1906, the telegrams attached hereto, and marked respectively G and H, were referred to the inspector, with verbal instructions from the division commander to submit a preliminary report at once, closing the investigation for the present.

The papers referred to on page 11 [92], line 7 [26], of the testimony appended hereto (marked D), relate entirely to stores of Messrs. Goldberg, Bowen & Co., seized by Lieut. Col. R. H. Patterson, Artillery Corps, and turned over to the medical supply depot, part of which were afterwards purchased for the use of the hospitals and rest returned to Messrs. Goldberg, Bowen & Co.

The evidence, so far as it goes, shows conclusively that the liquors received by the medical supply depot were all transferred to the Central Emergency Hospital, Jefferson Square, or to the Moulder School, and proper receipts taken in every case. The receipts could not be verified, as they are now in the possession of Colonel Brechemin, and the War Department has indicated that it is not deemed practicable to have them returned to headquarters Pacific Division for use and reference. The liquors sent to the Moulder School are still on hand there, except the broken packages, which were sent to the Central Emergency Hospital, Jefferson Square.

A letter was forwarded by the inspector, copy inclosed (marked I), requesting that Colonel Brechemin be directed to submit a full report of all liquors received by and transferred from the medical supply depot after the great fire of April 18-21, 1906. No reply has been received as yet, although it is known that Colonel Brechemin is at work on this report.

The evidence is, of course, very incomplete, but, so far as it goes, the inspector is satisfied that all the liquors transferred from the medical supply depot are properly accounted for, as receipts were taken in every case, wagons were guarded by sentinels, and in many cases a commissioned officer accompanied the wagon trains. As regards the liquors received by the medical supply depot, the evidence

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shows that the goods came without invoices of any kind. Whether or not an inventory was taken by Colonel Brechemin will probably appear in his report to be submitted, and the amount of such goods received will then be determinable.

Conclusion.—The conclusion, from the evidence now available, is therefore that the liquors of all kinds received by the medical supply depot, Presidio, San Francisco, Cal., were promptly stored and cared for there after their receipt, and were afterwards transferred to the Central Emergency Hospital, Jefferson Square, and to the Moulder School. The liquors transferred to the Moulder School are there now, with the exception of certain broken packages, which were transferred from the Moulder School to the Central Emergency Hospital.

Very respectfully,
JOHN P. WISSER,
Lieutenant-Colonel, Artillery Corps, Acting Inspector-General.
The MILITARY SECRETARY,
Pacific Division.
On July 31, 1906, after closing this report, the telegram, a copy of which is appended (marked K), was received from Col. L. Brechemin.
[Indorsement.]
Approved, but a final report should be made after Colonel Brechemin reports fully.
A. W. GREELY,
Major-General, Commanding.

EXHIBIT A.
[Telegram.]

SIGNAL CORPS, UNITED STATES ARMY,
Moulder Warehouse, June 2, 1906.
Maj. C. R. KRAUTHOFF,
Folsom Street Dock:
Eight wagonloads of miscellaneous drugs and hospital supplies sent here from the Presidio. Order not signed. Drivers instructed to deliver same to Moulder warehouse. Have no space for them. Please wire instructions.
KILIAN.

EXHIBIT B.
[Telegram.]

SIGNAL CORPS, UNITED STATES ARMY,
Moulder Warehouse, June 2, 1906.
Captain KILIAN,
Moulder Warehouse:
Reference your telegram, do not receive drugs and hospital supplies from Presidio.
KRAUTHOFF,
Commissary.

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EXHIBIT C.

HEADQUARTERS PACIFIC DIVISION,
San Francisco, Cal., July 21, 1906.
Lieut. Col. JOHN P. WISSER,
Inspector-General, Pacific Division,
Presidio of San Francisco, Cal.

SIR: The division commander desires that you examine into and report on all liquors which have been received at and transferred from the medical supply depot to all points in the city of San Francisco. In this report it is desired that you distinguish between liquors which belong to the regular medical supply and those which were sent here for relief purposes. This report should show quantities shipped and received, with time and place of destination.

Very respectfully,
S. W. DUNNING,
Military Secretary.

EXHIBIT D.

TESTIMONY IN THE CASE OF THE DISAPPEARANCE OF LIQUORS WHICH HAVE BEEN RECEIVED AT AND TRANSFERRED FROM THE MEDICAL SUPPLY DEPOT (LETTER DATED HEADQUARTERS PACIFIC DIVISION, JULY 21, 1906).

JOHN K. WAGGAMAN, teamster, was called, and, having been duly sworn by Lieut. Col. John P. Wisser, Artillery Corps, acting inspector-general, testified as follows:
Question. What is your occupation?
Answer. Until to-day I have been train master for the depot quartermaster, San Francisco, Cal.
Question. Now, what is your position?
Answer. I don't know exactly; I am employed by the post quartermaster, Presidio.
Question. Please state what you know of the transportation of liquors from the medical supply depot to other points in this city.
Answer. All the liquor that I know of went to Goldberg & Bowen; one wagonload supposed to contain liquors.
Question. Do you remember the date?
Answer. No, sir; I could not give you the date.
Question. State more fully about it.
Answer. They refused to accept them. They were returned to the medical supply depot.
Question. What became of them after that?
Answer. That I am unable to state.
Question. But you do state that they went afterwards to the Moulder School?
Answer. No, sir; you misunderstood. I said that the load I took to the Moulder School were boxes labeled "maltine" and "creoline," to the best of my knowledge.

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Question. Did you have any information that they contained liquor?
Answer. No, sir; I have no reason to think that they did.
Question. Go on.
Answer. They refused to accept them at the Moulder School. Captain Kilian stated that they had no doctor there, and they did not need any medical supplies. He told me to take them back where I got them, which I did.
Question. To the medical supply depot?
Answer. Yes, sir. That afternoon I pulled them back to the Moulder School.
Question. Did they accept them?
Answer. No, Sir; I was held there an hour and fifteen minutes and then told to take them to the Jefferson Square Central Emergency Hospital.
Question. What happened then?
Answer. That is all.
Question. They received it?
Answer. Yes, sir.
Question. How many cases were there?
Answer. I am unable to say. There was a man always sent from the medical supply depot, and he had them sign a receipt and turned it in to the medical supply depot.
Question. Did you haul any other loads that were supposed to contain whisky?
Answer. No, sir.
Question. Do you know anything further about the matter that appeared in the papers this morning regarding the whisky?
Answer. No, sir; only that Captain Kilian came down there and asked me about it, if I knew or remembered when he refused to accept a wagonload of goods. I told him I did. He asked me what it contained. To the best of my knowledge and belief it contained maltine and creoline, as it was so labeled. There was a man with Captain Kilian and he said, "Didn't some of it contain whisky?" I replied, "I don't know you; it is none of your business." He says, "I see you have read the papers; I see you are posted." He asked my name. Then he asked me where I took it. I told him to the Central Emergency Hospital. I told him all the employees had left, and there was not sufficient force to unload it. So, sooner than lose more time, we volunteered to unload it. Then they gave all the teamsters a drink.
Question. What! A drink?
Answer. Yes, sir; whoever was in charge there—out of a small demijohn. So he says, "Are you sure about that?" I says, "Yes." He came back and asked me if I took a receipt for it. I told him, "No." I didn't have any authority to take a receipt. There was a man sent from the medical supply with a receipt, which I suppose was signed, but I don't know. He was with the wagon.
Question. Did you find out who this man was?
Answer. No, sir.
Question. How long have you been connected with the service?
Answer. Off and on, sir, for about twenty years, I guess.
Question. What were you before the earthquake and fire?
Answer. Well, I had just got back from Manila about a year ago. I was master of transportation over there for General Bell and General Lee. That

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was at the brigade corral. I have been employed in the post here continuously since about the 21st day of September, two years ago, when I came back from the islands.
Question. Have you ever had any trouble with the army officers with whom you served?
Answer. No. sir.
Question. Is there any other information that you can give me with reference to the transportation of liquors from the medical supply depot?
Answer. The only thing is there were several wagonloads—I don't know how many—I understood were shipped to Oakland. Whether they were or not I could not say.
Question. Do you know that these contained liquors?
Answer. No, sir; I do not. I know part of them contained beer.
P. J. KING was then sworn by the inspector, and testified as follows:
Question. What position did you hold until recently?
Answer. Acting quartermaster, under Lieutenant Powell, from about May 20 to June 30, at the medical supply depot.
Question. Please state what you know of the transportation of liquors of any kind from the medical supply depot to points in the city.
Answer. On or about June 3 or 4—between the 1st of June and 5th of June—Colonel Brechemin ordered the whisky stored in warehouse 3 shipped to the health department or Moulder School. The train of wagons was loaded with barrels of whisky. The train master (whose name, I believe, was Holtman or Boltman—depot quartermaster's train master) signed for the load. He signed under Colonel Brechemin's orders. Colonel Brechemin ordered me to make out a receipt for the whisky; one I made out for the train master to sign and one for him to have signed when it reached its destination. I headed the receipt, "Health Department, Moulder School." On the return of the wagons the train master turned over the receipt to me, and I destroyed his receipt to the quartermaster for the load, as I had the original receipt from the receiver at the Moulder School. I turned the receipt over to Colonel Brechemin.
Question. Do you know who signed it?
Answer. I can not recollect the name, sir.
Question. But it was signed for at the Moulder School?
Answer. It was signed for at the Moulder School. It was signed, but they had not changed the heading where they signed it. I did not ask the driver where he delivered it.
Question. How many wagons were there?
Answer. I believe, eight. The next shipment of whisky was a day or two after. I shipped the remainder of the whisky in warehouse 3 in barrels and also the whisky in warehouse 4—that is, wines, cordials, bitters, etc. The wagon master was also given a receipt to have signed when he delivered it. The receipt was headed, "Health Department, Moulder School." On his return the wagon master brought me two receipts—one for the full barrels and full cases received at the Moulder School; another was a copy of the broken cases, partly emptied barrels and demijohns received at the Central Emergency Hospital, Jefferson Square, signed by Doctor Hughes. I asked the wagon master why he did not deliver it all to the Moulder School. He replied that they would not receive any but full barrels and full cases, and that they directed him to deliver the partly emptied kegs, barrels, and demijohns to the Central Emergency Hospital at Jefferson Square. That is all pertaining to

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the whisky that I had anything to do with the shipment of. There was whisky shipped to Goldberg & Bowen, Oakland, but that was shipped by Mr. Byrne, the chief clerk of the medical supply depot. This occurred previously—in the early part of May, not later than the 15th of May. I was requested by Colonel Brechemin to send a guard to escort the whisky to its destination. This I did.
Question. Is there any further information that you can give me on this subject?
Answer. No, sir. Colonel Brechemin has all the receipts, and dates I am not positive of.
Question. What has been your service in connection with the Army previous to the earthquake and fire?
Answer. I worked in the Medical Department, 655 Mission street, since January, 1903.
Question. Has your conduct always been satisfactory to the officers under whom you served, so far as you know?
Answer. Yes, sir.

WILLIAM L. BOLTON, wagon master, depot corral, was sworn by the inspector-general, and testified as follows:

Question. Please state in full what you know of the transportation of liquors from the medical supply depot to points in the city.
Answer. On the 23d day of June I was ordered by Captain Nugent to take a train of either five or seven wagons—I have forgotten which—and report to the medical supply depot, and haul whisky from the Presidio to the Moulder warehouse. I arrived there. Colonel Brechemin had the wagons loaded with cases of whisky and barrels, and I requested him to put a soldier in charge of the whisky, which he did, I going along to see that the teamsters did not tamper with the cargo. I arrived at the Moulder warehouse and reported to Captain Kilian, and he ordered it unloaded there, which we did. I found out that one of the clerks employed there was going to receipt for the whisky, and I advised the soldier to have Captain Kilian himself receipt for it in person. Captain Kilian informed me it was none of my business and that when anything was invoiced to him he would sign for it. He told me to mind my own business and he would mind his. So the clerk signed the receipt and returned it to the soldier, who returned it to some one in the medical supply depot, I don't know whom.
Question. Then the whisky that you hauled was left at the Moulder School, so far as you know?
Answer. Yes, sir.
Question. Who was the soldier you refer to?
Answer. I don't know; I think it was a messenger in one of the quartermaster's offices of the Presidio—I don't know whether Major Devol's or Captain Nugent's. That is all I know about it.
Question. How long have you been connected with the depot quartermaster's?
Answer. Just since the 24th of April. I was transferred from the Presidio—from the depot quartermaster's office—at the trouble.
Question. What was your duty at the Presidio?
Answer. I was carried as teamster; was working in the wheelwright shop.
Question. For how long?
Answer. Probably about two months. I have been altogether employed for two years in the Quartermaster's Department, Presidio, as teamster.

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Question. Did you at any time take any whisky from the medical supply depot to Goldberg, Bowen & Co.?
Answer. No, sir.
Question. Or any other whisky dealers in town?
Answer. No, sir.
Question. Did you have any beer or liquors transported to the ferry for Oakland?
Answer. No, sir.
Question. Do you know anything further as to what became of this whisky that was taken back from the Moulder School to the medical supply depot?
Answer. No, sir; I never hauled any.
SAMUEL A. BYRNE, chief clerk of the medical supply depot, was sworn by the inspector, and testified as follows:
Question. Will you state in full what you know of all liquors received at and transferred from the medical supply depot to points in the city?
Answer. All that I know or had anything to do with, with reference to the shipment of liquors, was on June 23—two wagonloads. I oversaw their being loaded in Colonel Brechemin's absence. There were two wagonloads, 41 cases in each wagon, making 82 cases on the receipt from the guard.
Question. Where did they go?
Answer. To the Moulder schoolhouse. We had a guard placed over them.
Question. An enlisted man?
Answer. Yes.
Question. Who receipted for it?
Answer. Yes; he receipted for the cases.
Question. You don't know anything about a further receipt?
Answer. No, sir.
Question. How did the medical supply depot get this whisky—where did it come from?
Answer. I don't know.
Question. It was not purchased by the Medical Department?
Answer. That I could not say.
Question. In the vouchers that I overlooked with you there was no mention of any beer, whisky, or liquors of any kind?
Answer. No, sir; none of any kind.
Question. Is there anybody in the medical supply depot who would know where they came from besides Colonel Brechemin, who is absent?
Answer. Not to my knowledge. All that I know of is that I receipted, on or about the 25th of April, for one wagonload of assorted liquors from Goldberg, Bowen & Co., which was stored in the medical warehouse of the General Hospital, and reported to Colonel Brechemin.
Question. Were the cases that you saw shipped from the medical supply depot to the Moulder School labeled whisky?
Answer. Yes, sir; they were.

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Question. Did you superintend the shipment of any supplies to the Moulder School labeled "maltine" or "creoline"?
Answer. No, sir.
Question. Do you know of any such supplies?
Answer. No.
Question. Is there any further information that you can give me on this subject, or can you give me the names of any persons who can give me information upon it?
Answer. Mr. Sternberg might have some knowledge of it.
Capt. JULIUS N. KILIAN, commissary, U. S. A., was interrogated by Lieut. Col. John P. Wisser, Artillery Corps, acting inspector-general, on July 23, 1906, at the Moulder School, and having been duly sworn by the inspector, testified as follows:
Question. Will you please state all the liquors of any kind that you have received from the medical supply depot in this city since the earthquake and fire?
Answer. I took charge of this warehouse on May 1, 1906, and I found a large quantity of liquors and medical supplies in the warehouse. In consulting with Major Krauthoff, who was my superior officer, he instructed me to send all medical supplies of every description to the medical supply depot at the Presidio; all quartermaster's stores to the Crocker School. A similar order I received afterwards, I think, direct from Major-General Greely. I had not receipted for this whisky and was not accountable for it, so I sent it within two or three days to the medical supply depot at the Presidio in accordance with these instructions.
Question. You don't remember how much there was?
Answer. A large quantity; there must have been over 10 or 12 wagonloads.
Question. Barrels and cases?
Answer. No. only cases; no barrels. On June 2, between 11 and 12 o'clock, a teamster came into the office here and informed me that he had 8 wagonloads of whisky for the Moulder warehouse. I told him that he had made a mistake in bringing the whisky here; that all whiskies or medical supplies go to the medical supply depot at the Presidio. He informed me that it was from there he was sent here to me. Upon my request for the dray bill or waybill he produced a slip of paper upon which there was nothing written but, if I remember correctly, "179 cases of hospital supplies." That is my best recollection of it. There was no name and no directions on this slip of paper. The wagon master informed me that it was a colonel of the United States Army who sent him here. I doubted his word, maintaining that if an officer of the United States Army had sent any stores to me he would sign his name and rank and give the authority by which he directed it to me. Prior to that I had questioned him as to whether it was Major Krauthoff, Major Devol, or Colonel Febiger. He stated that it was neither one of these names, but it was a colonel with a name that was hard to remember and hard to pronounce. When, thereupon, I refused to take the stores he argued with me, saying that it was a hard matter for his horses to return to the Presidio and possibly be sent back here. So, to make sure that there was no mistake, I wired Major Krauthoff at Folsom street dock, asking instructions. (See Exhibit A. appended.) About half-past 12 o'clock I received Major Krauthoff's answer, instructing me not to receive drugs and hospital supplies from the Presidio. (See Exhibit B. appended.) About 5 o'clock in the evening the same wagon master, accompanied by a first lieutenant, assistant surgeon in the United States Army, whose name I do not know—I think, however, it was Lieutenant Powell—came again to demand of me to receive the stores, the lieutenant saying that it was a direct order from General Greely. I informed him that I had written orders from General Greely not to receive any other stores but subsistence articles, and that unless I had a written or direct

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order I would not receive them. After talking the matter over with the lieutenant and Dr. George H. Richardson, contract surgeon, United States Army, I decided to consult Doctor Shiels, who was then and is now in charge of hospitals and charitable institutions. Doctor Shiels in my presence called up the doctor in charge of the Central Emergency Hospital, at Jefferson Square, and asked him whether he had room for eight wagonloads of medical supplies. I think Doctor Shiels said whisky; the wagon master told me it was whisky, and I reported to Doctor Shiels that it was whisky. He evidently received an answer in the affirmative, and addressing me, he said, "Captain, it will be all right to send it over to the Central Emergency Hospital, in Jefferson Square." I immediately returned to the warehouse and informed the lieutenant, who, in my presence, instructed the wagon master to go and deliver the stores at the Central Emergency Hospital, in Jefferson Square, on Geary and Gough streets. The lieutenant started with the wagon master in that direction. Do you want me to tell you all I know about it?
Question. If you please.
Answer. On or about June 15 I was called by telephone to Doctor Devine's office in the Hamilton School, the request being that Mr. Bicknell, assistant to Doctor Devine, wanted to see me on a private matter. Upon arrival there Mr. Bicknell stated that they had a quantity of whisky coming, part of which would have to be received immediately, and whether I could possibly make room for it at the Moulder schoolhouse, as the committee were desirous of placing it in my charge, for the reason that a large quantity of similar stores had disappeared and no trace of it could be found; and my impression now is that he stated that for that very reason they did not desire this quantity of whisky stored at the Central Emergency Hospital, in Jefferson Square. I stated that whisky not being a subsistence article, I did not like to be responsible for it, and, in the second place, that it always causes trouble in a warehouse; that men who could be trusted with all other stores would have to be closely watched, so that it causes a great deal of trouble and annoyance; that personally I was opposed to being made a storekeeper of intoxicating liquors. Upon my request, however, that nothing but original packages should be turned over to me and that under no circumstances orders would be given for part of the whisky, and as a personal accommodation to Mr. Bicknell and Doctor Devine, I would take charge of any amount of liquor that they wanted me to take care of.

(At Captain Kilian's request a clerk brought him a warehouse book, consulting which he continued:)

On June 15 we received 45 cases of whisky from the Santa Fe warehouse, 1 case being in bad condition. On June 23 I received 2 loads of whisky—1 of 38 and 1 of 40 cases, 1 bottle being broken in one of the cases. On June 23, later in the afternoon, 82 cases more were received. This came from the Presidio. Again, on June 26 I received from the Presidio 25 barrels of whisky. On June 28 there were received from the Presidio 3 barrels of claret, each about half full; 1 keg of port, about 8 gallons; 1½ barrels of port, about half full; again 1½ barrels of port, about half full; 1 barrel of port, about three-quarters full; 1 barrel of sherry, three-quarters full; 2 barrels whisky, nearly empty; 1 barrel of gin. On June 29 I received from the Presidio 13 barrels of whisky, 9 boxes of whisky; 13 cases of port. All broken packages or barrels not full I sent to the Central Emergency Hospital, in Jefferson Square. These included 4 cases whisky; 1 keg brandy; 8 demijohns assorted liquors; 2 cases sherry; 1 barrel sherry; 1 demijohn vinegar; 4½ gallons alcohol; 1 keg port, about 8 gallons; 1½ barrels port, about half full; 1 barrel port, three-quarters full; 1 barrel sherry, three-quarters full; 1 barrel whisky, nearly empty; 1 barrel whisky, nearly empty; 1 barrel gin, about half full. I have now on hand 160 cases whisky, 38 barrels.
Question. Part of this you say you received from the Presidio. What office in the Presidio do you refer to?
Answer. The medical supply depot.
Question. Who received the liquors sent to the Central Emergency Hospital?
Answer. I don't know, sir.

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Question. Did you get any receipt from anybody there?
Answer. No. sir; I got no receipt and demanded none. I didn't take charge of the liquor at all; I refused to take it.
Question. Who was in charge of the Central Emergency Hospital at that time?
Answer. If I am not mistaken, Doctor Hughes.
Question. Was this liquor sent to the Central Emergency Hospital with the consent and knowledge of the people who asked you to store it for them—Doctor Devine and Mr. Bicknell?
Answer. Yes.
Question. The whisky that was stored at the request of Mr. Bicknell, is that still on hand in your warehouse—all of it?
Answer. Yes; all of it with the exception of those broken packages sent to the Central Emergency Hospital.
Question. As to the broken packages, you didn't tell Mr. Bicknell?
Answer. Yes, I did. I made an express condition that I was not to be asked to store broken packages or barrels only part full, and so I sent all broken packages to the Central Emergency Hospital. I have no other information on the subject.
On June 24, while Lieut. Col. John P. Wisser, Artillery Corps, acting inspector-general, was examining witnesses at the medical supply depot, Presidio of San Francisco, SAMUEL A. BYRNE, chief clerk, medical supply depot, appeared and stated that he desired to modify his testimony previously given. With reference to the subject of papers left in the office by Colonel Brechemin, he now testifies that certain papers were left, and these he handed to the inspector-general; also that there were papers in the safe relating to Goldberg, Bowen & Co.

C. M. WOLLENBERG, purchasing agent for the relief work at the medical supply depot, having been sworn by the inspector, testified as follows:
Question. Will you please state what you know with reference to the receipt and delivery to points in San Francisco of liquors by the medical supply depot, and of their transportation to different parts of the city since the fire of April 18-21, 1906?
Answer. Well, I can not state much about the receipt of it, Colonel. I have nothing to do with the receipt of the liquors at all. While I was not in an official way in charge of the issuing of liquors, I know that no liquors went out of here without requisition and a receipt being given for them after the depot was located on these grounds. On the shipping of the liquors to Moulder School, the wagons were loaded in the morning and returned here shortly before noon, as the contents of the wagons were refused.
Question. What date was that?
Answer. I can not state the date.
Question. How many wagonloads were there—about?
Answer. About eight. To my recollection, a train of eight wagons. It consisted of relief stores entirely; that is, not regular army supplies—drugs and liquors.
Question. Well, by relief stores you mean stores that had been donated?

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