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Chief Engineers - Chiefs of Department:

edward P. Walsh
Edward P. Walsh
Chief of Department
1948 - 1953

  • Appointed to the Department, January, 1922, age 27, occupation, Postal Clerk
    • Assignments as a fireman: Engine Co. No. 58, 1922, Engine Co. No. 37, 1922, Engine Co. No. 5, 1925
  • Appointed Lieutenant, July 1, 1927
    • Assigned to Engine Co. No. 22, 1927
  • Appointed Captain, January 14, 1936
    • Assigned to Engine Co. No. 12, 1936
  • Appointed Battalion Chief, December 23, 1937
    • Assignments as Battalion Chief: Battalion 8, 1938, Battalion 2, 1942
  • Appointed Assistant Chief, December 1, 1943
    • Assigned to Division 1, 1943
  • Appointed Chief of Department, January 21, 1948
  • Retired, August 1953
  • Died - October 1953

His brother William was appointed to the Department in 1932.

Highlights of his tenure as Chief Engineer:

  • 1948, the work week was reduced to 56 hours beginning its problems of increased employments and budget requests
  • 1948, placed its own two-way radio communications channel in service separating from the joint facilities with the Police Department
  • 1948, a new set of Rules and Regulations was approved and adopted by the Board of Fire Commissioners

Edward P. Walsh was appointed on January 21, 1948, a busy year for the new Chief.  A survey of the city's fire defenses was being conducted by the National Board of Fire Underwriters, always a critical period for a fire department.  On May 7, 1948, the work week was reduced to 56 hours, beginning its problems of increased employments and budget requests.   In August, the Department had finally placed its own two-way radio communications channel in service; until this time it had relied on use of joint facilities with the Police Department.  On December 15, 1948 after many months of preparation, a new set of Rules and Regulations was approved and adopted by the Board of Fire Commissioners.

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